Tag Archives: Poland

Overseas travel reinforces importance of studying history

by Citlaly Zamarripa, Presidential Scholar, pre-physician’s assistant major
____________________________________________________________
Most young people don
’t understand that something as horrific as the Holocaust
could happen again. Perhaps it wouldn’t replicate itself to it’s entirety, but instead in new ways or even worse, to a greater degree of evil.

On the trip to Lithuania and Poland with the Presidential Scholars, I experienced first hand what it would be like to be alive during the time of the Holocaust, and it made me realize how little I knew about any of it, and how terrifying it must have been for the people who had to suffer though it. It also made me realize that I need to do my part in bringing back the importance of such an important part in history.

Auschwitz sign
“Work sets you free” sign at the entrance to Auschwitz during the Scholars’ visit January, 2016. The original sign was stolen in recent years, and this is a replica.

Before the trip I had about the same mentality that most young people have about the Holocaust. I thought we were making it too big of a deal. As awful as that sounds, there is a whole generation who feels this way and has lost touch with just how important this really is. We are letting the history behind this slide right by us because it has been talked about throughout our lives so often. Yet we do not seem to know very much at all about what exactly happened. I’m sure we could all tell you about Anne Frank or Hitler, but if you ask us for details of the time period or of the lives of those who suffered through the gruesome conditions of this genocide, we wouldn’t have much to say at all. What I find the biggest and scariest issue of our overall understanding is that we do not know how the Holocaust came about or the events that led up to it. We don’t realize that this wasn’t because of an evil person making everyone do as he commanded. Hitler was a persuasive person and people trusted him as their leader. People were persuaded into believing that one social group was the root of all their problems and that all of their frustration and anger should be focused on them. So they chose to follow him and they allowed him to carry on with his plan and eliminate anyone who got in his way. Who’s to say that something similar couldn’t happen now?

I am so grateful that I have been given the opportunity to see firsthand what exactly I was taking for granted. I realize that most of what I experienced overseas cannot be replicated by studying a text book, but I know that the magnitude of the Holocaust is impacting regardless of where you study it. Therefore, I encourage everyone to rethink what you know about the Holocaust. So that we may not let the importance of it die, and most certainly not allow a similar situation arise.